Tag Archives: church

A walk around Arboleas

A walk around Arboleas

We spent the morning cleaning up around La Casa. The previous owner left a lot of things that we wanted to go through and reorganize. I lined the shelves of the upper kitchen cabinets (he had tiled the bottom cabinets — nice! easy to wipe clean!) We went through all the tools and what not that he left, and did some rearranging.

After that we took a walk over to Arboleas. The walk to the village takes us through a small olive grove and across the bridge which is surrounded on either side by lemon and orange trees.

Arboleas

Looking toward Arboleas

Olive tree

Olives

Lemons

Lemons!

Citrus groves

The groves along the bridge to Arboleas

Oranges

Oranges

Oranges

…just one, honest!

Arboleas is a small village, and while there are a couple of places to eat, and a few shops, it is a very low-key place. The narrow streets are winding, and it was a little confusing to find our way around.

Arboleas streets

Arboleas

There is a church and a Moorish watchtower, which are both very prominent among the other buildings, so we went to visit those. The Iglésia de Santiago was built in the late 19th century. The original church of Arboleas was built in 1492, after the expulsion of the Moors, but it has since been destroyed and nothing of that original church remains today.

Arboleas Church of Santiago

Church of Santiago

The Arboleas watchtower was built during the 15th century, but I don’t know much about it other than that.

Torre de Arboleas

Torre de Arboleas

View from the Arboleas watchtower

The view from the Arboleas watchtower

During our walk around Arboleas, we happened upon this interesting little park. It was full of these weird exercise machines. You just know we had to try them all out…

Arboleas exercise

Arboleas workou

Ooof!

Arboleas exercise park

Tony Little, eat your heart out!

There is a square in front of the city hall, and next to that is a small park with stone benches and a statue of Al-Arbuli. From what I have gathered, Arboleas was named after Abdalacis Ben Abu Al-Arbuli who was a 14th century Moorish scientist. Al-Arbuli was a resident of the city and he wrote a book (called Food Treaty) about the foods of Andalucia. The book is in the Spanish National Library, so it definitely holds some major significance.

Arboleas City Hall

The City Hall of Arboleas

Al-Arbuli Arboleas statue

Al-Arbuli

 

Albox

Albox

Even though we were feeling under the weather, we decided to stroll around Albox and investigate this quaint town. Every town has a “Plaza Mayor” and this one was really lovely.

There was a beautiful church at one end of the plaza, and we went in to see the architecture and take some pictures. It was truly beautiful. It always amazes me to see how intricate the design of a small town church is in Europe and here in the States our modern churches are so “cookie cutter.”

Eglésia de Santa Maria

 

We left the church and sat on a bench in front on the Plaza Mayor to relax. A lot of people started arriving and we wondered what was going on because it seemed an odd time for Mass. Soon we realized people were arriving for a funeral service and so we left the bench and walked around the town. Albox is a typical little Andalucian town, with beautiful winding streets covered in mosaic tile.

Gorgeous door

 

Tiles on the wall of a building along one of the side streets in Albox

This picture below is the coat of arms for the city of Albox. We thought it was very interesting because it depicts the fruit trees which are so abundant here, but it also shows a representation of the river which is now a totally dry riverbed. The only time there is water in the riverbed is during a rain, but then it quickly dries up again. We were baffled by this because it is said that long ago people came and fished on the banks of the river Almanzora, but now it is only a dry and dusty rambla. How did this happen? One woman told us that Franco dammed the river to stop the peasants from having access to water for their crops, but try as I have to validate or dispute this, I can find no information one way or another. Anything I read tells me: “The river used to be full, but now is at most a small trickle.” and that is that.

Maybe we will find out the story behind the dried up river some day.

Albox coat of arms

 

Driving in the dry riverbed!